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What is Neurodiversity?

Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity refers to variation in the human brain regarding sociability, learning, attention, mood and other mental functions in a non-pathological sense.

It was coined in 1998 by an autistic Australian sociologist Judy Singer, who helped popularize the concept.

She advocated that brain differences are normal, rather than deficits. And that Neurodiverse people experience, interact with, and interpret the world in unique ways.

This concept can help reduce stigma around differences in learning and thinking.

Dyslexia

Dyslexia is the most common neurodivergence, and most understood, usually affecting someone’s ability to read or write accurately.

Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia is a learning difference that affects how the mind processes actions, usually affecting coordination and movement.

Autism

Autism is a spectrum condition which affects how people interact and communicate with the world.

ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is characterized by inattentiveness, impulsivity and hyperactivity.

Other

We cater for the full range of neurodivergence. Check out some less-common learning differences, including dyscalculia, dyspraphia and hyperlexia!
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For every ten people, one of them is likely to be dyslexic

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There are around 700 million dyslexic people worldwide

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Despite being 10% of the population, 22% of dyslexics are unemployed

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Research suggests 52% of children with dyslexia may also have dyspraxia

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Males are twice as likely to be diagnosed than females

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10% of people in the UK have at least mild to moderate dyspraxia

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Research shows that 1 in 59 children are diagnosed with this neurodivergence

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Males are four times as likely to be diagnosed than females

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There are over 700,000 people on the autistic spectrum in the UK

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The worldwide percentage of adults with this learning difference is estimated at 2.5%, although figures vary.

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Males are three times more likely to be diagnosed with the neurodivergence than females

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Research shows that approx 41% - 55% of families with one child with ADHD, have one parent with the learning difference too.